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Posted by Leon (Guest), on 2001-03-17 12:00:47

Floor Inlays

NOTE: the following messages have been transferred from the original SMA.com Message Board Leon User ID: 0359544 Sep 23rd 12:08 PM OK, here is something that I always wondered about, and don't know if you guys touched on...how about floor inlays when you are doing rear screen setups while rematting in the foreground, ala Dynarama? Sometimes the set on which the model is standing throwing a shadow is impeccable and not at all noticeable, and sometimes it is very noticeable (remember Kali's off color inlay in "The Golden Voyage of Sinbad"?)What have you guys done to match the ground? Shoot lots of tests? Do you guys have setpainters who worked on the actual live action set work with you so you can match the floor? When rephotographing the rear image does the animation camera neg pic up the color differently therefore you have to test many difefrent paint schemes? Do you construct the floor yourself? What about rocky terrain or grassy terrain, they must be hard to match also...Ray did an incredible job matching the pebbly ground during the Calibos/Perseus fight in Calibos' lair in "Clash of The Titans". What have you guys found difficult? StopMoDan User ID: 2024664 Sep 24th 5:27 PM Not many today, do Ray Harryhausen's Dynarama methods but it is amazing how he mastered this art. The only other person that I know of, who still possesses this knowledge, is Jim Danforth. I am not an expert on this but from my few experiments and reading the documented, vague information of what Ray & others did: Yes, you must do "tests" and it's "trial & error" in matching the elements; yes, the camera negative will interpret colors & shadows differently from the rear or front projected image. I suppose, with experience you learn how to intuitively match the projected image & set so that it will be somewhat close. Harryhausen's work was not perfect (available methods at time & deadline schedules) but it was his energetic animation style, using the photoreal-surrealness of the stop motion technique, and good storytelling, that propelled his stop motion classics. Maybe others might elaborate on your topic.