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Posted by simwave, on 2003-12-26 03:03:37

Tie-downs without drilling?

I would not like to drill my set floor, so I was wondering if there was an alternative method for tie-downs to keep the character in place that would not require to drill the set floor. Thanks for advance and I'm sorry for my English, I'm Finnish:) But I guess it's not that bad...

Posted by Strider, on 2003-12-26 03:51:52

Hi Simwave. What's the reason for not wanting to drill through your table..... let me guess, are you using a decent table and you don't want to damage it? Right now I have a similar situation, until I get some lumber and build myself a proper animation table, and what I'm doing is this..... I clamped a piece of plywood along the edge of my table and I animate only on the plywood. There are other alternatives of course. You don't always need to show the feet... and as long as they're offscreen you can just embed them in big lumps of modelling clay and stick them down. You could build up a few layers of styrofoam or corkboard on top of the table and stick pushpins through the feet. This works better with lightweight puppets, like ones with wire armatures. Then of course there's the method where you use a sheet of steel for your animation surface and place magnets either in the puppets' feet or underneath the metal. For this you'd need to have nothing else there.. in other words don't lay the metal sheet on a table, the thickness of the wood would block the magnets. It might be possible to have your puppets hanging from some kind of flying rigs all the time, but that would make for some strange skittish movement... you wouldn't be able to firmly plant the feet down, unless maybe with a little blob of non-drying plumbers' putty or stikki-wax. Just a few suggestions. And by the way your English is fine.

Posted by simwave, on 2003-12-26 08:42:49

Thanks for your answer! You guessed my situation right, I would not like to ruin(is this spelled right?) my table. I think I'll try the pushpin method, sounded fine to me :)

Posted by jim danforth, on 2003-12-26 20:42:05

SIMWAVE: A Finnish member of this website. Good! Have you ever considered animating any of the adventures from the Kalevala? If your puppets are heavy, here is another tie-down method that works: Put a piece of plywood on your good table. Anchor it with some C-clamps. Then fasten your puppet to the plywood with wood screws. The screws go through the puppet's feet and down into the plywood. Just be sure to use screws shorter than the thickness of the plywood plus the thickness of the puppet's foot. You might need to hide the screw head with clay or with a flap of rubber. Jim

Posted by simwave, on 2003-12-27 01:07:05

Hi! My puppets are not heavy so the pins work just fine, but if I sometimes make heavier puppets then I might give that a try. Oh, and I haven't considered animating Kalevala...

Posted by Nick H, on 2003-12-27 21:14:36

I use small wood screws when I can't reach under the set to push up tiedowns, and it works well. With hollow latex shoes, I can cut a slit in the rubber, and it will close up and hide the tiedown. The Kalevela has always seemed like a great subject to me, too. I am inspired by the paintings of Akseli Gallen-Kalela, and have thought about basing some animation on it. But how much better for a Finn to do it!

Posted by jim danforth, on 2003-12-30 19:50:06

NICK H wrote: "I am inspired by the paintings of Akseli >Gallen-Kalela, and have thought about basing some animation >on it. But how much better for a Finn to do it!" Nick, I'm guessing you may have been reading the La Rousse Encyclopedia of Mythology. I agree that the Gallen-Kalela illustrations are wonderful. Have you seen the Russian film based on parts of the Kalevala? The U.S. re-edited version is called "The Day the Earth Froze" or something like that. Jim

Posted by simwave, on 2004-01-02 10:42:40

>The Kalevela has always seemed like a great subject to me, >too. I am inspired by the paintings of Akseli >Gallen-Kalela, and have thought about basing some animation >on it. But how much better for a Finn to do it! Yes it would be better for a Finn like me to do it, but at elementary school my evil old teacher made us study Kalevala all the time, so I'm a bit fed up with it, if you know what I mean :)

Posted by Nick H, on 2004-01-02 12:59:43

Yes, I understand how school can sometimes take the enjoyment out of something. But sometimes it comes back to you later in life. Good guess Jim, I did see Gallen-Kalela's work in the Larousse, I bought it in 1970 and have it still. It introduced me to him and to Ivan Bilibin as well. In fact I've been unable to find any other books showing the Finnish artist's work.

Posted by simwave, on 2004-01-06 01:07:29

>Good guess Jim, I did see Gallen-Kalela's work in the >Larousse, I bought it in 1970 and have it still. It >introduced me to him and to Ivan Bilibin as well. In fact >I've been unable to find any other books showing the Finnish >artist's work. Actually it's Gallen-Kallela...

Posted by darcy_p, on 2004-01-29 17:59:10

Actually it's Gallen-Kallela... its not hard to see you have been studying this guy flat out... you know how to spell his name !! quite a feat if you ask me.... mind you im not exactly an 'intellect'

Posted by U_Ani, on 2004-02-02 13:32:35

Hey,I'm Finnish too!Brilliant!So I'm not the only one.:-)

Posted by Tedder, on 2004-06-02 09:03:13

A simple method several stop motion productions use to save wear and tear on sets is to mount small "whole earth" disc magnets in the feet of the puppet armatures. Then you mount the same type of disc magnet on the end of a small piece of dowling to act as a handle, and you can hold the puppet fast to the table by placing one magnet under the set to grab the puppet's feet. As the puppet takes a step, you move the magnet under the table. When you do this, it limits the types of sets you can build, or at least presents challenges to each set. the set must be thin wood, and any steps or such need metal mounted inside to give the foot magnets a place to grab.

Posted by Bruno Moreira, on 2004-07-16 08:03:36

I use magnet a lot on my projects. The best surface you can have for that is definitively glass. The magnet works better on glass tables.

Posted by simwave, on 2005-01-02 13:45:28

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] Hey,I'm Finnish too!Brilliant!So I'm not the only one.:-) [/div] Wow! It's really fun to know that I'm not the only Finn around here. It's such a small world, isn't it:).