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Posted by patrulinka, on 2011-01-12 12:21:14

things to keep in mind when working in 3D stereoscopic

Someone can tell me things that an artistic director should cosider when working in 3D stereoscopic? Is my first project in 3D, could someone give me some tips about how the sets should look like to get the maximum result?. And actually I would like to know, in what the work is different in general? thanks in advance

Posted by Nick H, on 2011-01-12 17:15:19

It's pretty straightforward if everything is there on set, built to the same scale. Once you find the distance between left and right eye that works for you - probably somewhere near the distance between the puppet's eyes - just shoot the puppet on set as normal. Of course, it's nice to have some depth in the set - some bits that go back a bit, others that come forward - to make the most of the 3d. The difficult bit comes in when you want to use some of the old tricks like a foreground miniature, where something is really close to camera so it appears larger. In 3d, you can see it really is close to camera and not that big. I found that with my Harryhausen birthday tribute in 3d. I had one kid become the cyclops, so i put him close to camera to make him larger. In 2d, if you cheat the eyelines, it could look like he really is big, but in 3d it's obvious where he is, and you can tell if the other kids are actually looking at him or not. My intention was that this was in his imagination, not real, so it was ok. It also gets more complicated when compositing different elements together, especially if they are built to different scales. Getting them to appear at the right size, and at the right depth, is really a matter for the DoP more than the art director (Although, for many of us, that's the same person) . Camera position, adjusting the distance between left and right views, and adjusting the convergence will take a bit of fiddling. I'm about to start designing and building some sets for another director's stereo 3d production, so I'm in the same boat. Much of the action takes place in a public swimming pool complex. Built to 1:6 puppet scale, the set would be huge - a diving pool with 30 ft high diving platform (5 ft high in 1:6 scale), 100 ft main pool (about 15 ft long in 1:6), kiddie pool, entrance and exit, changing rooms, fence around it all and houses visible in the distance... looks like it would be way bigger than my studio. So I'll probably have to do a smaller 1:12 set with only some closeup sections in 1:6. That will mean duplicasting some elements in 2 sizes. It will be interesting to see if we can make it all fit together in 3d.