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Posted by GuilleGalli, on 2011-01-04 03:15:23

Painting the film studio ¿which color?

Hello again! I am recycling a room for an exclusive study of stop motion filming. What color paint would be ideal? Maybe black? Or no matter the color? Thanks!

Posted by leevi, on 2011-01-04 04:25:07

I'd go either black or dark gray. No point painting matte color, as you never want the whole wall green etc, only around the area you need to key out. If you paint the whole wall or room green, you'll end up having green reflections all around the set. Which is very very bad.

Posted by GuilleGalli, on 2011-01-04 06:06:12

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] I'd go either black or dark gray. No point painting matte color, as you never want the whole wall green etc, only around the area you need to key out. If you paint the whole wall or room green, you'll end up having green reflections all around the set. Which is very very bad. [/div] Thanks for your response. There is something about this I do not understand. Sorry for my bad English. I can paint the walls of the studio with matte black? Thanks!

Posted by leevi, on 2011-01-04 07:26:55

Ah, sorry, I misunderstood. Yes, matte black is perfect. The best choice. For some reason I assumed you meant some other color for green/blue screening. There was nothing wrong with your English. My bad. Edit: Now that I re-read your first message, it's very odd that I got the impression that you thought of painting green screen paint. :o

Posted by Dean, on 2011-01-04 08:13:28

I think you should paint it like this. http://www.stopmotionanimation.com/dc/user_files/14699.jpg



Posted by GuilleGalli, on 2011-01-04 09:58:14

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] Ah, sorry, I misunderstood. Yes, matte black is perfect. The best choice.For some reason I assumed you meant some other color for green/blue screening. There was nothing wrong with your English. My bad.Edit: Now that I re-read your first message, it's very odd that I got the impression that you thought of painting green screen paint. :o [/div] Thanks! I saw your videos on youtube, I liked the fluidity and the acting of the animation, as well as editing. Congratulations!

Posted by Andrew Brown, on 2011-01-04 15:28:35

Good call, mang. I'm currently shooting in a very small room with white walls. Black would be much better. My bluescreen lights are my fill lights, and my fill lights are my keylights and vice verse and etc.

Posted by leevi, on 2011-01-05 05:31:21

Thanks! I finished the film (EGO) a couple of weeks ago. Now busy sending it to fetivals. As soon as I have the trailer ready I'll post a thread about it.

Posted by JeNnDyLyOn, on 2011-02-06 00:18:05

This might've been better as a separate thread altogether but I'll ask it anyway as it somewhat pertains to the topic at hand: If you're working on your own set, does the color of the floor or tile matter as well? Is it better to have a tiled floor or carpet? I don't plan on having a track or dolly rig hooked up, just the tripod.

Posted by Strider, on 2011-02-06 00:27:25

You don't want carpet if you can help it. If your animation table and your tripod are sitting on carpet they can move around slightly between frames, resulting in an onscreen earthquake and ruining your work. In fact, a concrete floor is better than a wood one, because some older wooden floors are a bit creaky or uneven and can shift as you walk around on them. But don't think you absolutely HAVE to have a concrete floor or you can't animate at all... it's not really all that critical. These are just things to keep in the back of your mind in case you notice some shifting of the set and can't figure out why it's happening. I don't think the color or material of the floor can really affect lighting. Walls and ceiling can, but I wouldn't worry too much about the floor. If you do happen to have a really bright reflective floor and when you're setting up a shot if there's a light or two aimed down that are reflecting up onto your puppets and destroying the dark shadow areas you're working hard to create, you could just throw a towel or a rug on that part of the floor.

Posted by JeNnDyLyOn, on 2011-02-06 00:35:29

All right, awesome! Yeah the floor's tiled but it's old so I may have to roll up the sleeves, slip into some overalls and re-tile it so that it's even and leveled again :) Thanks a bunch, Strider!

Posted by Strider, on 2011-02-06 00:39:26

Actually it doesn't nee to be level. The important part is that it doesn't make those scary creaking and groaning sounds as you walk on it and shift around under you. High spots and low spots aren't a problem as long as they're solid.

Posted by JeNnDyLyOn, on 2011-02-06 00:41:44

Really? Hmm, okay. The thing is that it's that plastic kind of tile and it's peeling in areas; it's pretty old. I may just do it as another touch-up to the room-turning-studio :)