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Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-08 00:09:36

Realistic Dry Walls

I'm planning to make a realistic wall, I've use stucco on foam to create realistic rocks wall. Whats a good material to create drywall look? Its probably gonna used used on top of foam or wood.

Posted by Leroy Binks, on 2009-08-08 08:21:27

Most of the time drywall is covered with either paint or wallpaper, thus you never see the drywall. Are you going to have unfinished drywall or holes in it to where you would need to know that the walls are drywall?

Posted by hemble, on 2009-08-08 17:14:23

I've used plaster of paris on 90% of walls that I do and it works great. I also mix in some woodglue to give strength and also the woodglue keeps it from cracking. Ron

Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-08 18:05:11

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] Most of the time drywall is covered with either paint or wallpaper, thus you never see the drywall. Are you going to have unfinished drywall or holes in it to where you would need to know that the walls are drywall? [/div] The drywalls will probably look like this. What materials should i use to simulate the holes, torn walls. http://www.stopmotionanimation.com/dc/user_files/11194.jpg



Posted by hemble, on 2009-08-08 19:47:12

Wide sheets of balsa wood would perfectly for this sought of damage. Ron

Posted by Leroy Binks, on 2009-08-08 23:12:19

I would imagine wood would splinter too much to truly represent a hole in drywall. What about actual drywall? A full sheet is less than 20 bucks and cuts with a razor knife. It's easy as hell to work with and you can get many panels out of a 4x8 sheet.

Posted by Strider, on 2009-08-09 00:04:33

I think foamboard or gatorboard would be a good miniature version of drywall. You should even be able to bust it up in ways that look similar, since it's built similarly....

Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-09 14:54:31

I never tried using gatorboard or dry, have to visit home depot someday. For painting the wall, is house paint okay for this?

Posted by Nick H, on 2009-08-09 19:50:55

I use water-based, flat interior acrylic wall paint for all my sets.

Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-09 21:50:05

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] I use water-based, flat interior acrylic wall paint for all my sets. [/div] How about a wooden floor? would dyeing the wood in acrylic paint work? I have a bunch of them.



Posted by Nick H, on 2009-08-09 23:39:36

Yes, you can brush wood with watered-down brown acrylic paint and it will act as a sort of wood stain. Not as good as real wood stain, but avoids the horrible solvents. I usually put a coat of shellac on after it's dried. Shellac thins with methylated spirits (alchohol) and has a transparent golden colour, so it adds a little more warmth to the tone while still showing the grain. One or two coats give you a semi-gloss sheen. It dries much quicker than oil-based varnishes. If you need a wood grain effect on something other than wood (like mdf or card), you have to first paint a tan color base coat, let that dry, then use a thinned-down dark paint to drag the grain lines on it with a coarse, almost-dry brush.

Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-15 00:34:33

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] Yes, you can brush wood with watered-down brown acrylic paint and it will act as a sort of wood stain. Not as good as real wood stain, but avoids the horrible solvents. I usually put a coat of shellac on after it's dried. Shellac thins with methylated spirits (alchohol) and has a transparent golden colour, so it adds a little more warmth to the tone while still showing the grain. One or two coats give you a semi-gloss sheen. It dries much quicker than oil-based varnishes.If you need a wood grain effect on something other than wood (like mdf or card), you have to first paint a tan color base coat, let that dry, then use a thinned-down dark paint to drag the grain lines on it with a coarse, almost-dry brush. [/div] This came up in my mind in environment class that i took. For shiny white floor, wall, how would i make this? How about a glass window? http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/uimages/ny/5-14-white-lacquer-1.jpg

Posted by Strider, on 2009-08-15 01:39:07

Not a word of thanks for the help you received on your other questions, and now you just throw a new one at us? Aren't they teaching common manners anymore? b;)

Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-15 16:15:46

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] Not a word of thanks for the help you received on your other questions, and now you just throw a new one at us? Aren't they teaching common manners anymore? b;) [/div] Im in a rush to get projects done, but i do apologize and thank you Strider and other guys for answering my questions.

Posted by Strider, on 2009-08-15 22:50:38

Ok, that works for me! :-) For a set like that I'd probably use the same foamboard I mentioned earlier, only now I'd coat it with some gloss spray, or a glossy white paint. On second though, foamboard might warp with a heavy application of paint or gloss spray, so it might be better to use plywood, coated several times with gesso and sanded smooth between coats, then glossy white paint and possibly even followed by gloss spray or turtlwe wax or something to make it shiny. There might be a ready-made material that's already glossy white like that, but if so I can't think of what it might be. Possibly someone else can. For glass I'd use plexiglass.

Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-16 12:01:46

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] Ok, that works for me! :-) For a set like that I'd probably use the same foamboard I mentioned earlier, only now I'd coat it with some gloss spray, or a glossy white paint. On second though, foamboard might warp with a heavy application of paint or gloss spray, so it might be better to use plywood, coated several times with gesso and sanded smooth between coats, then glossy white paint and possibly even followed by gloss spray or turtlwe wax or something to make it shiny. There might be a ready-made material that's already glossy white like that, but if so I can't think of what it might be. Possibly someone else can.For glass I'd use plexiglass. [/div] whats gesso I never heard of it? Is their a brand you recommend? For plexiglass, what sandpaper would I use? 400 to 600 grit sandpaper? How would I cut it with? Thanks

Posted by castlegardener, on 2009-08-16 14:04:27

plexiglass can be cut by scoring it and then snapping, or can be cut on a table saw with a fine toothed blade

Posted by Leroy Binks, on 2009-08-16 21:45:29

Wow dude. It really sounds like you need a step by step directions on set building. No offense or anything, but every question spawns three more. Is there time/ budget for you to hire a set builder?

Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-16 22:24:02

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] Wow dude. It really sounds like you need a step by step directions on set building. No offense or anything, but every question spawns three more. Is there time/ budget for you to hire a set builder? [/div] I rather do everything by myself. The only time I ask that many questions is when I never use the materials or never heard of it.

Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-16 22:38:04

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] Wow dude. It really sounds like you need a step by step directions on set building. No offense or anything, but every question spawns three more. Is there time/ budget for you to hire a set builder? [/div] Sorry my questions can be really annoying,I get excited.:7

Posted by Strider, on 2009-08-16 22:57:06

Depending on where you're from, plexiglass might be called perspex. It's basically just clear plastic sheets that you can buy at a hardware store.

Posted by Nick H, on 2009-08-17 00:25:46

Hiyashiox, What tools do you have to work with? It wouldn't be all that helpful if we suggest materials you need a bandsaw and drill press to work with, if all you have is a craft knife and some sticky tape! Some things are easier and faster if you have a well-equipped workshop, but if you don't there are always other ways to do it. A smooth glossy white floor surface - will you have puppets walking on it? I can't think of anything tougher to have to hide tie-down holes in, so for this you might consider magnets. So a sheet of steel would be a good material for the floor. It would need some framing to support it so it doesn't flex. Walls and other things can be made from lots of different things. Perspex comes in clear, and also in white and other colours, if you go to plastics suppliers. White perspex is good if you need to backlight it, it's translucent enough to let light through, but if you don't, I'd probably stick with card or foamcore.

Posted by hayashiox, on 2009-08-17 14:09:25

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] Hiyashiox,What tools do you have to work with? It wouldn't be all that helpful if we suggest materials you need a bandsaw and drill press to work with, if all you have is a craft knife and some sticky tape! Some things are easier and faster if you have a well-equipped workshop, but if you don't there are always other ways to do it.A smooth glossy white floor surface - will you have puppets walking on it? I can't think of anything tougher to have to hide tie-down holes in, so for this you might consider magnets. So a sheet of steel would be a good material for the floor. It would need some framing to support it so it doesn't flex.Walls and other things can be made from lots of different things.Perspex comes in clear, and also in white and other colours, if you go to plastics suppliers. White perspex is good if you need to backlight it, it's translucent enough to let light through, but if you don't, I'd probably stick with card or foamcore. [/div] I don't have any power tools at this time, its lagging me. I dont mind buying Smaller power tools as long as it fits in the garage. Ill find used tools at a swapmeet.

Posted by Strider, on 2009-08-17 20:13:02

Power tools no shop should be without -- A hand drill and a jigsaw.

Posted by Nick H, on 2009-08-17 21:08:25

Yes, those were the first tools I got. A cordless drill is better if you can afford one, because it's really fast for putting in screws or removing them, as well as drilling. After those 2 hand-held tools, I found the next things to get were a drill press and a bandsaw. A smallish benchtop bandsaw will do, but make sure it's a 2-wheel model. The old 3-wheel bandsaws that were made for hobbyists aren't made anymore, because they break the blades - the wheels are too small and bend the blade into a tight curve, then it straightens out, then bends, then straightens.... I spent hundreds of dollars on replacement blades for the 3-wheeler I had at the ABC because they couldn't afford a new 2-wheeler. We could have bought 3 of them with the money spent on blades! The bandsaw is better for smoother cuts, and for small objects which vibrate too much with the jigsaw's reciprocal action. But the jigsaw is still essential for cutting big sheets of chipboard which won't fit in the bandsaw. The next good tool was a small bench-mounted belt sander with a 6" sanding dic on the side. After cutting wood or MDF I give it a quick sand. It can also round the corners on MDF, or help make all sorts of shapes. These are the ones I wouldn't be without. All of these can be bought pretty cheaply these days - Made in China, and not going to last a lifetime, but will work for a few years. In my case, it's lack of space that is stopping me getting a couple more things like a lathe and a grinding wheel, I don't have any bench space to put them. I got a table saw with a circular saw blade at my own expense to do a job at the ABC where there was no budget, so I could do straight cuts and make up lots of scale model planks - but I have nowhere to set it up at home so it sits idle while I do everything with the bandsaw and jigsaw. One day I'll set it up outside and do a big batch, then put it away again. Oh, one more essential tool - for something cheap and really useful, get a hot glue gun! It really helps get things put together in a hurry.

Posted by Strider, on 2009-08-17 21:19:14

Yeah, the additional tools Nick mentioned are the ones I really want to get but haven't yet. Heh... a friend who knew a lot about woodworking once showed me how to duct-tpe a handheld belt sander upside-down onto a benchtop to make it function like a benchtop belt sander! Worked pretty well. I don't think personally I'd get a metalworking lathe, but I have considered getting one of the smaller and much less expensive wood lathes for making small props. Could have helped a lot in making little bottles from acrylic rod stock! I'd only recommend a (metalworking) lathe and milling machine if you intend to get into making armatures. But a glue gun is definitely an essential!!

Posted by Nick H, on 2009-08-18 00:30:50

I made the model for my bottle from a fine-grained wood, but i still turned it on a metal lathe - 'cause that's what we had in the Propsmaking workshop back then. Then I turned my model for the glasses out of perspex rod, on the same lathe. The metal lathe can work on any material, and has more precise control, but less craftsman's "feel", than proper wood turning with a hand-held chisel. Less likely to get the angle of the chisel wrong and badly stuff it up, but slower. I can imagine turning brass, aluminium, and sometimes steel, as well as Perspex and wood, so one of those mini-lathes would be really nice. One day. I have resorted to turning the occasional very small object on a drillpress, but it's not ideal. But if we all followed the rules and only used things for what they were intended for, we'd never do any stopmotion! :P

Posted by Strider, on 2009-08-18 01:57:52

Well, ya got a good point there!! For some reason I was thinking of a full-sized metal-turning lathe, but they do make minis and micro's, don't they? I guess the price on those isn't much more than for a mini wood lathe. It would definitely be worth a little more for that much added capability.