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Posted by lasuperbiscotte, on 2008-01-12 15:52:11

rear projection screen

hello everybody. I'm a french animator, so first of all, sorry for my bad english. I am interested in rear projection for a short film project melting live action shots and animation shots ( like in Harryhausen or Tippet's fx)and I can't find informations about the material used for building the screen behind the scene. Please, if someone can gave me an idea. Is this equipment still findable?

Posted by Jim Aupperle, on 2008-01-12 16:19:29

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] hello everybody. I'm a french animator, so first of all, sorry for my bad english.I am interested in rear projection for a short film project melting live action shots and animation shots ( like in Harryhausen or Tippet's fx)and I can't find informations about the material used for building the screen behind the scene. Please, if someone can gave me an idea. Is this equipment still findable? [/div] This comes about four years too late. I had a professional glass rear projection screen that I had to get rid of when I moved and I tried to give it away. Couldn't find anyone who wanted it and had to trash it. We used a sheet of Lee 216 Full White Diffusion for some small rear projected images within matte painting back when I worked at Boss Film. You might try some of that and test Lee Opal Frost LS410 and Lee 250 1/2 White Diffusion while you're at it. There are rear projection big screen TV sets, what kind of material do they use? Might see if you can just get the screen from one of those. http://www.filmandvideolighting.com/lee216fulwhi.html Did a search and came up with http://www.del-lighting.com/projection_screens.html "...we are happy to send samples." It's been too long since I did any process projection so I don't have much to help you with. The link above seems like a good place to start if you need anything more than some Lee 216. Process projection was never easy and today if I needed to combine stop motion with live action I'd use a blue or green screen (this advice from someone who earned his living using miniature rear and front projection for about 20 years) below are some photos of my process projection in the OLD days Jim Aupperle









Posted by lasuperbiscotte, on 2008-01-13 07:34:08

Thanks a lot Mr aupperle for your answer and for having made a search on the web. I didn't have tried "rear" projection in google because in french, we say "retro" projection and I thought it was the same term in English. My project isn't still really accurate. It's been a long time since I want to try to make a short film involving "old days" special fx with animation, rear and front projections, matte paintings etc. I've grown with the incredible animations and fx from robocops, indiana jones, clash of the titans etc. As a kid, I knew I would work in special effects later, and I 've "witness" the transition between stopmotion and CG. Today, as I work as a stopmotion and cg animator, I would like to pay tribute to these wonderful scenes that have driven me to make this job. This is for this reason I want to use the same methods and skills, even if it's harder than using blue screen. I'm searching for a kind of authenticity. I don't know how the project will be financed but I guess there won't be mountains of dollars. I work in a little animation studio. They have lights, space enough for the sets. For the projection, I think I will test a simple vidéo projector. I know the quality is rough in comparison of a real film projector but the short will surely filmed in video for economic reasons.... Yesterday, after this post, I've try to project video behind a sheet of tracing paper and it seemed to operate properly. I'm still sorry for my bad english.

Posted by Jim Aupperle, on 2008-01-17 16:41:58

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] For the projection, I think I will test a simple vidéo projector. I know the quality is rough in comparison of a real film projector but the short will surely filmed in video for economic reasons....Yesterday, after this post, I've try to project video behind a sheet of tracing paper and it seemed to operate properly. I'm still sorry for my bad english. [/div] If the projector has a zoom lens or if you can change the lens you'll find that the longer your focal length (toward telephoto) and thus moving the projector farther from the screen will reduce the hot spot. A telephoto lens on your camera will help with this but is is something of a trade-off since it can flatten the perspective of your shot. If you can do time exposures then oscillating the screen can blur out the grain in your screen. Try to keep the caamera and projector on the same axis or you could get some additional brightness falloff. White balance to the screen with the projector showing white light only. You might have to filter the light on the puppets to match the color bias of the projector. A Color Meter can be very handy in checking that the white light on your set matches the white light of the projector. http://www.aeimages.com/learn/color-correction.html That's the most I had to think about rear projection in 15 years. Last time I used it was on "Nightmare before Christmas" but I understand they might be using some on "Coraline" at Laika. Good luck and have fun! Jim Aupperle



Posted by lasuperbiscotte, on 2008-01-13 17:10:48

By the way, thanks for the advice. I'll remember when I am near nervous breakdown. It's not impossible I finally use green or blue screen and post-production to give the film an old tricks look.