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Posted by belloq, on 2002-01-14 15:32:16

NBC sculptural textured lines on Halloweentown hills- How??

Looking at some photos in the making of Nightmare Before Christmas book, I was wondering how they accomplished the textures on some of their landscapes. Specifically I am interested in the wavy line textures of the ground and hills outside of the town, in the cemetery and curly hill scenes. I believe these lines also extend into the holiday forest and can be seen clearly on the movie poster. I wanted to use this kind of detail in a set, but could not replicate the "feathery" almost brush-painted quality of these low-relief three dimensional details. Hydrocal sets too quickly to attempt a texture of that magnitude. (Unless one uses really cold water-would this work??) Self hardening clays are too heavy, cannot hold the details and are probably cost-prohibitive to cover an entire set. So if anyone has any ideas of how and with what materials/tools sets like those in Nightmare are detailed on top of hydrocal plaster, I would appreciate hearing about it. Many thanks.

Posted by johnl, on 2002-01-14 20:55:00

wats pig also has these lines, it gives a great 3d drawing feel. I thought they just used plaster for nmbc. I have the special eddition and selick only mentions that they covered evrything in plater. couldnt you do it in stages. dont forget the amount of forced pespective and matt paintings used made the set look alot bigger.

Posted by Nick H, on 2002-01-14 22:27:44

Someone posted on this topic before, back on the old Mark I message board. I've fould that tile adhesive makes a great texturing material, a little more flexible and less prone to flaking off than plaster. And it comes with a serrated metal scraper thing to apply it, and when you spread it on with the tool you get these raised parallel lines! I don't know if that's how they did it, but it would work.

Posted by 1, on 2002-01-14 22:46:52

Actually, You can skip coating your styrofoam if you just use a foam engraver. The engravers are just like a soldering iron. Only you touch the tip to the foam and it slightly melts it. All you would need to do is move it in a linear pattern to get the texture. We sell them if your interested. Marc