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STOP-MOTION SETS

Posted by Purehilarity, on 2007-10-21 12:52:46

Bedroom Set

I'm making a very simple bedroom set for a clay animation. I want to be pretty minimalistic. I'm going to make a bed, 3 walls, a floor. I will probably stain the floor and paste something, not sure what, to the walls for wallpaper. I might just paint them with wall paint though. Any ideas for what else I may add? Something like a bed-side table, a picture hanging, just to make it more believable that it's a bedroom. I'm new to this, so any advice would be helpful. Thanks!

Posted by Nick H, on 2007-10-22 02:51:17

I'd ask myself - Who's bedroom? What are they like, what are their interests. What world do they live in? If you know the character, and the time and place, you can create the room they would have. Period - contemporary, 70'd, Fifties, 19th century, medieval? My actual room tends to start out minimal... But it soon get cluttered with bits of paper, books, CDs on the bedside table, clothes on a chair near the bed. Some shoes on the floor. A shelf of books and DVDs in the corner. A basket full of dirty clothes. You could have a rubbish bin, overflowing with empty beer cans. A desk piled with more books and papers and an unfinished essay. A couple of empty pizza boxes. Some newspaper on the floor, with oily motorcycle engine parts laid out on it, and some tools... a coupe of posters on the wall. That would have been my bedroom back in my university days. Would you see the door into the room? A window? A wardrobe, or door to a closet? Carpet on the floor, or floor boards?

Posted by Purehilarity, on 2007-10-22 10:15:25

Thank you! I was having a lot of trouble deciding what kind of room to make it because I wanted to have it look like a young boys room, around 3-6 years old but not too modern. The problem was I didn't want to have it plastered with pop-culture items. I also want it to be really creepy when the lights go out, since this is a nightmare sequence. I bought a blue paper with trains and cars on it for the walls, I will try to put a picture up, and I stained some wood for the floor. I don't have a lot of time to work on this unfortunately.

Posted by youneekusername, on 2007-10-22 16:52:13

Kid's room would consist of a few simple aspects: -messy (clothes, toys, food, etc. scattered about.) -toys lying around (trucks, balls, dinosaurs, action figures, etc.) -children's furniture (perhaps brightly painted and slightly smaller than regular adult furniture.) -kid's drawings on the walls. -toy box. -backpack with homework. -kid's theme electronics (clown clock, dinosaur lamp, kid radio.) -racecar bed or bunk bed. I just recently made a bedroom for a 10ish year old and used some of these ideas to help give the overall look and feel of a kid who never wants to clean up his room! http://www.stopmotionanimation.com/dc/user_files/3459.jpg Hope I could help some. Good Luck. -Mike L.



Posted by Purehilarity, on 2007-11-03 11:18:54

Thanks. That's a great picture. I finished my set, and it doesn't look nearly as lively as that. Here are a couple of pictures of it. I will post a link to the animation when I upload it. http://www.stopmotionanimation.com/dc/user_files/3760.jpg http://www.stopmotionanimation.com/dc/user_files/3762.jpg







Posted by youneekusername, on 2007-11-03 17:55:16

I really like what you have here, but feel like it needs more. You could make some kid's toys to have scatterd around the toy box. Or even easier is just use real miniature toys (like "micro machines", "mighty max", and other tiny toys. Not sure if you have these, but I had a ton when I was a kid and luckily still had them around. Another thing is furniture. The bed and toy box are great, but you're going to want to include more to give it the impression that it's a boy's bedroom. Examples might be a nightstand, dressor, desk... My only other critisism is the flooring. The panels are much bigger than what you'd find in real life, so it gives away that its a set right away. I've used "craft sticks" which are basically popsicle sticks without the curve on the ends. These are easy to cut and easy to apply with any household glue. After that, stain can be applied. Or you could just use some watered down paint to give it an aged look. Another option is carpeting... Craft sticks can be found at any craft store or just about any department store too. Off to a great start!! I like the teddy bear, nice effect. -Mike L.

Posted by Strider, on 2007-11-03 23:40:22

The set looks good, and I especially like the lighting in the first pic! Maybe there could be a lamp or something in there.

Posted by Nick H, on 2007-11-04 19:40:21

Same reaction from me about the floorboards, but also the wallpaper. You've scaled down the pattern on the wallpaper so it looks right, so you need to do the same with the width of each roll. You can see the edges, so it shows. Measure the width of a roll and divide by 6, or whatever your scale is. I don't have any wallpaper in my house, but I think they are about 2 ft wide. At 1/6th scale, that would make your rolls only 4 inches wide. I've seen some photos of sets here where the peeling edges of the wallpaper was a really nice feature, it helped to sell the scale of the set because they were the right width. If you don't want to peel off what you've done, you could just score lines where they should be with a knife. I'd probably divide each width of paper into 3. If the real boards are 3 inches wide, and you are using 1:6 scale, you want about 1/2" wide boards for your set. It doesn't always need to be exact, there are probably a few different widths for floorboards anyway. Then, you could add some skirting boards along the bottom edge of the walls. They can be simple - just strips of heavy card, or thin ply or mdf, probably painted the same as the window frame.

Posted by Purehilarity, on 2007-11-05 14:09:29

Thanks for your help. Unfortunately I had to rush this project because it was a limited time assignment. I've shot the video already, and the teacher was impressed for a first set. I'll keep the comments in mind for next time definitely! The floorboards were definitely too big, you are right. As for micro-machines and small toys, I'd rather not use somebody else's work in my animations if I can avoid it. The wallpaper was somebody else's design and that was something I had to deal with under the constraints but in the future I'd like to make most things by myself.