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Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-08 13:45:46

Miniature Castle For My Movie

Hi guys, finished paintings of my castle yesterday. Still needs some work on the roof and the door and windows are missing, but I'm so proud I need to show you! ;-) So here it is, the castle and some details of the wall, the roof and the balcony.









Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-08 13:52:36

And some more :-)







Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-08 13:54:49

...and more...







Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-08 13:55:18

...and that's it! :+

Posted by Nick H, on 2007-02-09 01:24:00

Yep, it's all good! I like the way the individual stones project at slightly different depths and angles.

Posted by jamesride101, on 2007-02-09 16:26:51

Great stuff. I'm in agreament with what nick said about the stones :) I like the weathering as well. If you want more color contrast, You can also try something more on a small area by making some washes with more dilutant than paint. Green, yellow, red, blue, white... Just try painting bricks radomly with different washes. Then you can even put washes over other dried washes. If you observe old stones and bricks you will find every color of the rainbow in them. dark brown shoe polish or a bought leather wash diluted with mineral spirits can be a nice thing to spray on bricks while they lay flat too :) Watered down acrylics will work similarly but I don' find the result to be as random and cool looking. All colors of dry pastels have been known to work well for bricks and stones as well.

Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-10 16:11:47

Thanx :-) I was trying to give it a little twisted "Tim Burton like" kind of look... Maybe I'll try some multicolored washes...I did all the colorings with acrylics actually so maybe I'll try the shoe polish or the pastels too...thanks for the tip!

Posted by jamesride101, on 2007-02-10 20:51:52

cool :) if your acrylic base is dry, using acrylic washes shouldn't be a problem by the way. Have fun! Go crazy!! I love weathering stuff like that... Can't go wrong and it always looks great on film. I can post some pics from stuff I made for the "night at the museum" dioramas if you like. Those don't have a tim burton stylized look, but it might give you some extra ideas.

Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-11 07:42:05

Oh yeah, I'd love to see it! This is my first time doing stuff like this, so I'm really happy for any inspiration. So if you could post some, I'd be really glad! Thanks

Posted by jamesride101, on 2007-02-11 12:25:30

Hmmm, on second thought... I better wait for the dvd release of the film before I post anything ;-) I'm no entirely sure about getting in trouble if I post these pics, but I've been told to use the "when in dought... don't do anything" method of deciding. But you can check my web site out for other examples of weathered stuff that I've worked on. In the mean time, I'll inquire about the dangers of posting pics in the pre-dvd release period.

Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-12 02:06:12

Sure, that makes a lot of sence, I know that method very well ;-) I actually checked your web site yesterday. The only thing I can say is WOW! That stuff is amazing! I realized again how much I got to learn x( Oh and your Jack 'n' Chick is COOOOL!

Posted by jriggity, on 2007-02-12 20:11:54

Excellent props. The hand made irregularity of all the stonework makes the magic. I always love to see the uneven hand made aspect of whatever props are created for stopmotion miniatures. jriggity

Posted by Federico, on 2007-02-12 21:11:18

Hey JP, great work! The set looks great and the pictures show it in a very nice way. Some questions, if you don't mind: What is the real size of the castle? Did you work with a specific scale or just with aproximated proportions? Is it your own design or somebody else's? Sorry about so many questions }( ... Keep working and good luck.

Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-13 15:32:45

Hi, the real size is about 20cm (7.8 inches) width, 18cm (7 inches) tall, and 16cm (6.2 inches) deep. The "stones" are 2x1x1cm, each handmade ;-) I didn't work with a specific scale, I just took a ruler, did a few sketches and thought "Hey, that's a good size!":-) It will only be used for a panorama view, there won't be any characters walking around, so I didn't need to fit any sizes to anything... And the design is all mine! :+

Posted by Federico, on 2007-02-18 21:12:51

Hey, thanks for the detailed info. Great work and design! It would be cool if you can post some shot of your film some time.

Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-19 03:50:10

I will for sure, but I'm stuck right now...can't get the armature wire in Czech republic...and if I want it shipped from USA, I pay unbeleavable money for the money order... but as soon as the problem is solved, nothing can stop me :-)

Posted by Federico, on 2007-02-19 05:46:40

Well, I live in Buenos Aires -Argentina- and it was not easy to me to get aluminium wire around here. There are no stop motion related stores (just some animation books stores), and it is not available at hardware stores. I finally got it easy & cheap (and in different thickness) at places that sell all kind of stuff for those who make collars, bracellets, or cheap jewels. I've heard (but I'm not sure of that) that aluminium wire is also used in Bonzai (you know, the tiny little trees... ) Good luck.

Posted by Strider, on 2007-02-19 05:47:24

There may be hope yet! I don't know how well it would work, but you might be able to get some regular hardware-store aluminum wire and take it to a metal shop to get it [i]annealed[/i]. I say I don't know how well it would work because the hardware-store wire has already been [i]anodized[/i] or hardened, to give it greater corrosion resistance, and the hardening makes it more brittle. If you can find some kind of machine shop or metal fabrication shop where they have a furnace and know how to do this kind of thing, they could heat treat it in the right way to anneal it. But I think that would work better with raw (non-anodized) wire. Since it's already been anodized, it might not help. Possibly someone who knows their metallurgy a little better could comment?

Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-19 07:07:51

FEDERICO: Yeah, I was actually thinking about those two options, but the wires they use for both, the bracelets or the bonsai, are not annealed...and I tried to bow the bracelets one a few times and it broke pretty easy...did you try to make a puppet out of it? Did it work with no problems? STRIDER: Well, that would be a solution - only if you could get ANY aluminium wire here :-) But they stopped almost all the production, they use copper for everything these days. I need to find some animators around here and ask them, what do they use for the armatures. Still it seems like the easiest way to order the wire from abroad...

Posted by Strider, on 2007-02-19 07:24:07

[i]"Well, that would be a solution - only if you could get ANY aluminium wire here"[/i] Hmmm... well, I can see where that would be a problem.... x( Maybe you could get a shovel and start digging your own aluminum mine.....

Posted by Federico, on 2007-02-19 21:32:51

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] FEDERICO: Yeah, I was actually thinking about those two options, but the wires they use for both, the bracelets or the bonsai, are not annealed...and I tried to bow the bracelets one a few times and it broke pretty easy...did you try to make a puppet out of it? Did it work with no problems? [/div] Well, that could be the reason of my armatures never working out :P !!! I'm very new at this, so when my armatures break (it does happen many times) I'm not sure if it is because is not the right wire of if it is just not the right animator (it coul be both }( !) Anyway, I'm making these days new armatures with aluminium wire that I got at the jewerly store but I don't know if it is annealed or not. I'll let you know if this time my armatures finally survive for more than a few dozens of frames... I've read somewhere about people using "white brass round wire" ("alambre redondo de bronce blanco", I'm not sure if my translation to english is correct) but I've never tried it. Any one has?

Posted by planet jp, on 2007-02-19 07:28:43

:-) Now that sounds like something, that COULD be done! ;-)