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Posted by xj9000, on 2006-03-09 21:27:53

jumping!

as i have said throught the past month or so i am making a school movie. the storyboard is complete but i have one problem. i need to make an 8 inch tall puppet to jump off of a 40 inch tall cardboard box. this may sound easy but there is 1 huge problem. if it is possible, i need to do this without editing poles and stuff. i have a idea that during the fall after the jump i use the same color dowels as the box and push it in and move the puppet down with the rod making punctures in the box so the dowel holds the puppet. anything can help regards (i havent said regards in a while!) mad chicken productions :-) (-:

Posted by Strider, on 2006-03-10 00:03:41

Ah see... now that's more like it! This question can actually be answered in one bite. Your idea might work, or you could just make a slit down the side of the box and have a aire from thje puppet run through the slit, trying to keep it behind him where it can't be seen. The slit (or holes if you go that way) could be disguised as part of the architectural ornamentation.

Posted by Jim Aupperle, on 2006-03-10 08:35:51

[div class="dcquote"][strong]Quote[/strong] i have a idea that during the fall after the jump i use the same color dowels as the box and push it in and move the puppet down with the rod making punctures in the box so the dowel holds the puppet. anything can helpregards (i havent said regards in a while!)mad chicken productions :-) (-: [/div] I once animated a shot of a falling man (for Planet of Dinosaurs) using a similar approach of attaching one foot of the human puppet to a rod and animating that down a track. I hid the rod and support track by using an in camera split screen matte. I wasn't all that happy with the result because I thought it looked rather obvious that the foot was attached to something because of it's restricted movement. We still used the shot in the film becuse it worked well enough that we didn't want to spend the extra time doing it over. I got the idea from the scene in 7th Voyage of Sinbad where the Cyclops falls of the cliff. Let us know how your animated jump turns out. best wishes, Jim Aupperle

Posted by Nick H, on 2006-03-20 23:14:28

If the dowel or stiff wire that holds the puppet is behind the puppet, so that the puppet body actually hides it from the camera, you can do it that way. Make a row of holes, then fill them with a little plasticine of the same colour. Shoot the frame, then move the puppet and wire down to the next hole and replace the plasticine in the hole you just left. It works. I use a bit of stiff coathanger wire, sharpened so I can just stab it into the foam of the back of the puppet. Sometimes it needs 2 wires taped together, so 2 points about half an inch apart stick into the puppet, to prevent the puppet rotating on the wire when you don't want it to. with the wier stuck into the upper back, all the puppets limbs can thrash about freely. The only thing to watch out for is the shadow of the wire being cast on the wall so that even though the wire is hidden, you see a shadow. It may take some adjusting of the lighting to avoid that. For another film I cut a slit in a tree trunk (disguised by the deep bark texture) and animated a frog jumping up by putting a tripod with a centre column inside the tree, with a wire going to the frog. I just cranked the tripod a litle higher each frame to raise the frog. The frog was seen from the back, so the wire poked into his chest, leaving his legs free to jump. So you're on the right track, it can be done like this. The same concealed wire was used for holding a wad of paper that was thrown, once it left the puppet's hand it was held by a wire going into holes in the wall following an arc from the hand to a rubbish bin. I had to check every position beforehand to be sure the wad of paper would always hide the rod from the camera.